Canada has been gradually increasing its market share of international trade volumes in the Asia Pacific. The success of the Western Gateway can be attributed to strategic investments in infrastructure, competitive pricing and labour stability. Building on this success is a significant amount of private sector investment in Canadian ports and marine terminals. An efficient and cost–effective transportation system is critical in supporting these investments.  With further commitments to increase federal funding in infrastructure, it is critical that the cumulative impact of cost recovery for infrastructure, added services and competition for rail service does not erode competitiveness of Canadian gateways.  Competitiveness in our trade corridors can be realized by: A regional process that is tasked with overseeing the competitiveness of our gateways from an overall cost and regulatory compliance perspective. Such an authority should aim to reduce red-tape and cost…
Canada has an enviable marine safety record that continues to deliver transportation in diverse and challenging conditions. This is the product of a strong safety culture, comprehensive international and national regulations, and a pollution preparedness and response framework that has evolved to respond to the growth in marine commerce in Canada. While Canada’s marine industry enjoys an excellent safety record, it must seek continuous improvement, especially as growth in Canadian and international trade is expected in the future. Canada’s safety framework must be sufficiently adaptive to recognize the increased interest by regional and local communities to be more involved in the protection of the environment in which it operates. Furthermore, the safety framework of tomorrow should incorporate advanced technologies that could provide advanced warning of potential risks, increased transparency, and support supply chain efficiencies. An effective Canadian Marine Safety Framework…
Commercial marine shipping prefers predictability in the regulatory environment, especially as the capital investments associated with vessels and infrastructure are significant and must be made for a horizon outward of twenty years. In certain situations, regulations affecting the marine industry have been made in isolation and without a comprehensive understanding of the technical, operational, and commercial realities of shipping. In addition to having a predictable regulatory environment, commercial marine shipping is regulated globally and must be prepared to trade in new global markets. In order for this to happen, a predictable and harmonized regulatory approach is essential, especially with Canada’s major trading partners. The Marine Transportation Framework of the future should include: Access to key supply chain data so as to accurately influence transportation policy and regulatory development; The integration of scientific research from the public and private sector; A…
The Government of Canada has indicated its intent to establish a moratorium on the shipment of crude oil off coastal waters of Northwestern British Columbia. Currently, this region does not include any marine shipping of crude oil. The export movement of crude oil by ship cannot occur without the product first moving by another mode of transportation to the coast, such as by pipeline or rail. This initial movement of the product must be approved by specific federal government regulators at a minimum, and can include an additional provincial review process and subsequent approval.   A moratorium on marine transportation would set a negative precedence and should not be a substitute for existing strong international and federal regulations. It may also contravene Canada’s commitment to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. However, if such a policy decision…
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